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Cultural planning for Aboriginal children - new model

A new model of cultural planning has been implemented requiring the development of a cultural plan to be commenced within the first two weeks of an Aboriginal child being placed in out-of-home care.  The model assumes that everyone has a role in cultural planning and that Aboriginal people are best placed to provide cultural knowledge and inform decision making for Aboriginal children.

The child’s cultural plan includes various elements to promote, maintain and enhance the child’s connection to their County and culture while they are in out-of-home care.

Cultural planning - the new model

This document provides detailed information on the new cultural planning process, including principles of the new model, roles and responsibilities of the care team and tasks required to develop and implement the child's cultural plan.

Cultural plan tracker

This template will assist the allocated or contracted case practitioner to track and record the development of the cultural plan.

Cultural activities log

This template is to be used by the child's care team to record cultural activities in which the child has participated.

Cultural plan timelines flowchart

This flowchart provides details and timelines of the process for the drafting and endorsement of cultural plans.

Cultural plan templates

The cultural plan template includes all information about, and connection to, the child's culture, community and family.  The template also includes goals and tasks to maintain and develop the child's Aboriginal identity and encourage their connection to their Aboriginal community and cultural. 

Working with perpetrators of family violence to reduce risk to children - tip sheet

This tip sheet provides information that can be accessed quickly by practitioners and utilised in a variety of situations including:

  • when planning to interview a perpetrator
  • prior to a visit to a family
  • during supervision
  • reviewing a case.

Working with perpetrators of family violence - tip sheet

Working with adult perpetrators of family violence

This advice is about engaging and intervening with adult perpetrators of family violence. For the purpose of this advice, the term ‘perpetrator’ is used to describe persons who are alleged to have committed family violence and persons who have been assessed as responsible for harm due to their use of violence. It builds on the advice provided in the specialist practice resource Working with families where an adult is violent - specialist practice resource and should be read in conjunction.

Document ID number 2458, version 2, 6 June 2017.

Responding to family violence

Background

In 2015, a Royal Commission into Family Violence was undertaken to examine the family violence response system from the ground up and put victim survivors at the centre of family violence reform. The Royal Commission’s report, which made 227 recommendations was released in March 2016.

Four of the recommendations (25,26,27 and 28) relate specifically to improving child protection practice and systems to better respond to family violence. Key themes relating to child protection practice include:

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